Tech Watch

Rise of the megacities

The year was 1400 BC, and the city of Thebes was the capital and crown jewel of the New Kingdom of the Egyptian empire. Located on the banks of the Nile river, 800km south of the Nile Delta, it was a ...

#Throwback – IT varsity scoops Top Prize at the 2015 IBM Youth Innovation Challenge

Director of IT varsity Maseehullah Kathrada was awarded the top prize by IBM’s judges at the 2015 IBM Youth Innovation Challenge which was held at the University of KwaZulu Natal in Durban from the 25...

Part 2 of IBM predictions: AI can end world hunger

We are living in some of the most exciting times in history. Not only are we seeing science and technology advancing in unprecedented ways, but it is possible that, in the near future, we are also goi...

Smart cities key to Earth’s future as urbanisation balloons

In 2006 the world experienced a unique phenomenon: for the first time in human history, the number of people living in urban areas equalled the number living in rural areas. This was due to what is of...

Part 1: IBM’s predictions for our technological future

What are the five technologies that are going to fundamentally reshape business and society in the next five years? Some of IBM’s leading researchers shared their thoughts on this at IBM’s annual Thin...

Don’t dismiss President Ramaphosa’s smart city idea

The recent announcement by President Cyril Ramaphosa about developing a “smart city” in South Africa has created quite a stir and has triggered a lot of conversation. Unfortunately, it seems not many ...

Can technology be racist?

Can computer algorithms be racist? This was a subject of a heated debate in the US recently when Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez claimed that facial-recognition algorithms are biased against pe...

Computers make giant leap

Lee Se-Dol had never felt so helpless before. His opponent was getting better with each game, and coolly countering all of his best moves. It was a surreal experience. Lee is a legend of his time, the...

Advancing faster than we thought

Over the past century-and-a-half, we saw more technological advancements than all other periods of human history combined. There really are no surprises there: from the height of the First Industrial ...